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NY's neighborhoods Downtown




Manhattan is divided into neighborhoods, some of the most characteristic are Nolita, Soho, Little Italy, Chinatown, Greenwich Village, Chelsea, Upper West Side and Upper East Side, Tribeca, and the Financial District. Here are a few of their particular characteristics.

Nolita



Originally part of Little Italy, its limits are Houston Street on the north, Bowery on the east, Broome on the south, and Lafayette on the west, east of Soho.It’s a neighborhood with long streets, elegant, with designer stores. Its transformation occurred in the 1990’s when many Italian Americans migrated and was soon invaded by yuppies and shops. Since it was not possible to add it on to Soho it was named due to its location.

Soho



Originally part of Little Italy, its limits are Houston Street on the north, Bowery on the east, Broome on the south, and Lafayette on the west, east of Soho.It’s a neighborhood with long streets, elegant, with designer stores. Its transformation occurred in the 1990’s when many Italian Americans migrated and was soon invaded by yuppies and shops. Since it was not possible to add it on to Soho it was named due to its location.

Little Italy



This section of the city became so due to the large influx of the Italian population, where they settled and developed their own characteristics. The neighborhood took up Elizabeth, Mott and Mulberry streets, and even what is known today as Nolita, was part of Little Italy. Unfortunately around the mid-20th Century, Italian Americans went in search of new areas for different reasons. What still exists is the true expression of Little Italy on Mulberry Street, between Broome and Canal, which mostly hosts tourists enjoying the local cuisines.

Chinatown



Chinatown is an ethnic community densely populated by Chinese people living in New York. Initially constituted by groups named Tongs, gangs aligned with the Chinese Mafia, where they fought great battles amongst themselves. Chinatown’s limits are, up until the 1970’s, Canal Street on the north, Bowery on the east, Worth on the south, and Bexter on the west.

In 1968, immigration increased and exceeded the space allotted to that area, taking over parts of Little Italy and even today, the area named Nolita, is being overrun by the Chinese population. In the 1990’s, the same thing began to occur on the Lower East Side, leaving only remains of the Jewish community which previously inhabited the area. Today one can come across people selling knockoff purses and handbags, watches, jewelry and other things since police presence is quite low. Chinatown also has residential and commercial zones just like Queens and in Brooklyn you can also find small settlements of Chinese communities.

Tribeca



Tribeca is an acronym which means TRIANGLE BELOW CANAL. It was originally an industrial neighborhood, full of shops, warehouses and stores selling construction materials.

After small offices were installed there and its prices rose, artists and new talents began to arrive with the idea of creating a new Soho. One of the most important production companies is located there, Robert De Niro’s TRIBECA FILM CENTER, which hosts the TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL. Today it is full of bars and restaurants, exclusive shops and art galleries which makes it an ideal place for many.

The New York Pass